Suspect By Robert Crais

imgres“She snapped at the raining debris, and barked at the metal birds now circling the distant buildings like terrible wasps. There were more explosions, then a sudden silence filled the desert, and the clatter of running Marines approached . . .”

Best known for his series of Elvis Cole and Joe Pike novels, Robert Crais, on this occasion, chose to depart from the much-loved, much-debated characters of Cole and Pike, and instead penned a standalone book. His previous non-series release, discounting the Joe Pike spin-offs, was The Two Minute Rule.

Suspect is the story of police officer Scott James, who happens across a dangerous diamond heist in the early hours of the morning — and soon everything turns bloody: bullets flying and people dying (including his partner, Stephanie). Luckily, Scott makes it out alive . . . barely . . . with multiple gunshot wounds. Zap forward a number of months and Scott is mostly rehabilitated, although the psychological scars still remain. He sees a psychiatrist to help overcome the guilt of his partner’s death, and also, with the aid of hypnotherapy, he tries to remember any pertinent details that could push the police towards capturing the killers. 

Aside from this, Scott has just joined the K9 team — a special dogs unit — and is quickly enamoured by Maggie, a dog who has suffered her own pain (and bullet wounds) and whom he instantly relates to and bonds with. And from there, it’s a story filled with mystery, intrigue, guns, death, and canine-human bonding, all wrapped in a generically plotted bow.

The story isn’t the strongest (or most original, especially considering some of Crais’s past work); the detective angle, for the most part, is meagre and reactive; the twists are rare and obvious, although sufficiently executed; and the main meat of the story relies heavily on a chance encounter and a dog with a sharp nose. Yet, minor flaws notwithstanding, there’s enough here to sustain the reader’s attention, and although the plot ultimately follows a much-treaded ground by Crais, the dog angle at least gives it a fresh spin. And the crux relationship between dog and human is expertly handled, bringing a warmth and depth to the story that it might otherwise have lacked.

Its main downfall, however, is the ending. It seems rushed and a little too easy, as if Crais wanted to finish the book, or had to finish the book, in time for his deadline, and didn’t put much thought into how to end it. It’s not a terrible ending as such; it merely feels glossed over and raced through. The lovely, slow, simmering build-up of friendship and loyalty between dog and hero is smashed apart in twenty pages by a speedy dénouement and a tacked on ending.

In conclusion: Suspect is not one of Crais’s best . . . but even an average Crais novel is better than a great novel by many others in his field. 

Read it and enjoy it if you already know his work.

Start with LA Requiem if you don’t.


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