Rob Boffard: Part II

imgresIn PART I, Rob Boffard spoke about his debut novel, Tracer, which is due for release on July 2nd 2015. He also gave advice on how to approach an agent and some insight into the publishing world. Check it out here

In PART II, I delve a little deeper into his writing habits. 

GK: You have a strong journalistic background. Was the plan always to transition into a novelist?  

RB: I never planned transitioning into being a novelist. It just sort of happened! I’ve always enjoyed writing, and I was a journalist because to my mind that seemed like a career where I’d be able to do it regularly (plus, I love journalism anyway). I discovered over the years that while I was perfectly capable of being a journalist, the part I enjoyed most was actually putting pen to paper and writing the stories. It felt like a natural progression.

GK: How have your years of journalism informed and/or improved the way you approached the writing business?

RB: The advantage of being a journalist was that it gave me the opportunity and impetus to write regularly. I excised a lot of bad writing, because if I didn’t then my editors wouldn’t accept it. Being freelance has also taught me a great deal about managing money and selling my stories. It also helps me deal with rejection, because even now I still get my story ideas rejected on an almost weekly basis — sometimes daily. I’ve learned to move on very quickly.

GK: What would you say is the main difference between being a journalist and a novelist? In a sense you were creating stories and shaping narratives before, and now you’re doing the same but they’re all fictional.

RB: Absolutely. In many cases, it is actually quite rare for an editor to let me see their changes to a particular article before it is published, simply because of the nature of journalism and daily deadlines. Obviously I love it when that happens because it gives me a chance to make the story a lot better, but I don’t get too fussed when it doesn’t. When we first began editing Tracer, I told my editor that I would happily make any change she suggested as long as there was a good and logical reason behind it. So far it’s an approach that has paid off, because every change she has suggested has made the story better. I can only think of one change that I actually vetoed, although I’m going to keep that one under wraps.

GK: Many first time authors can be precious about their work — not wanting to change or rewrite certain things. You said earlier (in PART I) that “endlessly tinkering” with your book was a difficult process but essential. How important do you think it is to rewrite? And what advice would you give to the stubborn writers who refuse to change their work?

RB: You can’t publish a story without rewriting it, even if the rewrite isn’t extensive. No one’s first draft is ever quite good enough. If you think yours is, then you’re wrong. It’s that simple. The only time that isn’t the case is if you’re some kind of insane genius, and since those come along about once every hundred years, I’m going to assume that’s not the case.

GK: What’s your writing process? Do you try to hit a certain word count a day? Only have banana and eggs for breakfast? Wear your lucky pants and socks combo every morning before you start typing? Or do you just make it up as you go along?

RB: Pretty boring answer I’m afraid! I aim for around 1500 words a day, and often end up getting closer to 2000. I write in the morning after my fiancée leaves for work. I do a bit of a work out, listen to some loud and aggressive hip-hop, have a shower, blend up a smoothie so I can get my fruit fix, then all I have to do is tear myself away from the Internet and actually sit down and write. But it’s a rare day that I don’t hit my word count.

GK: I won’t ask where you get your ideas — I hate being asked that question myself — but how do you cultivate your ideas? If you get a flash of something, do you write it down that day and get to work on it? Do you let it simmer? What’s your process for nurturing an idea into something deeper and more satisfying?

RB: Interesting question. My ideas tend to come in bright flashes at the most unexpected times. I don’t usually write them down as they are pretty clear in my head, but sometimes I might make a few notes if the idea is particularly complex or is an intricate solution to a problem I’ve been having. After that, it’s just a case of interrogating the idea for weak spots. Once I start writing it down, I usually know pretty fast if it’s a keeper or not. 

GK: Are you the type to plan out your book in advance, or write as you go along? And if you’ve done both, which have you found to be more useful?

RB: Tracer was the first novel I’d ever written and I had no idea how to do it, so I did an outline more or less on reflex. It worked well, so I did it for the second one too. I also found that in both cases I went quite a bit off the original plan, and was more than happy to do so. After the second book was done, I launched straight into a completely different novel which I didn’t plan at all, and I found that to be quite a stressful experience. With an outline, even a very rough one, I feel like I’ve got something to help me find my way.

GK: Seeing as you began writing the sequels to Tracer whilst in the middle of going back and forth on the first one with your editor, did anything from that experience shape or change how you approached the writing of your sequels? Did you learn about a particular writing flaw of yours — maybe a propensity to overuse certain words/phrases, perhaps? Or did you just steam ahead with it knowing you’d deal with it in the rewrite stage?

RB: Yes, absolutely. I learned that there are certain things that I forget to do (like include physical descriptions of the characters, which is pretty important!). But I also don’t believe in waiting for things to be perfect before I start a project. I decided that I was capable of editing and writing at the same time, and changing things on the fly if I needed to.

GK: Any advice you could pass on to the aspiring authors out there reading this?

RB: None whatsoever. Almost all writing advice is snake-oil. The only thing that’s ever worked in all circumstances is: read lots, write lots.

GK: Great, I think that’s everything. Thanks for your time. Is there anything else you wanted to add?

RB: Thanks for the interview, and check out Tracer this July. It’s bad-ass. 

If you enjoyed the interview, please share/tweet/Facebook/ignore everything I just said, and also check out Rob’s website. He updates it regularly and there’s plenty more information on Tracer along with some cool artwork of his characters. And if you end up buying Tracer (which you can pre-order here), make sure to email me/comment below and let me know what you think. I’ve read it and it’s a fantastic novel. 

I’ve got a feeling the name Rob Boffard will be making some waves over the next few years.


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